Category Archives: brushing teeth

Is it Time to Replace Your Toothbrush?

Photograph of two green and blue tooth brushes. One is worn out and the other is new and in good condition.

Whether you use an electric or manual toothbrush, you will need to replace it periodically. Old tooth brush heads have worn out bristles that can’t adequately clean your teeth as well as a newer toothbrush and replacing your toothbrush often helps to reduce the number of germs on your toothbrush. Here are some guidelines to keep in mind when it comes to replacing your toothbrush so you’ll experience more positive feedback at regular dental cleanings.

Recent Illness

If you’ve experienced a recent illness, it is probably a good idea to replace toothbrush. The germs left behind on toothbrush bristles from a bacterial infection could lead to reinfection. It’s difficult to know how contaminated the bristles are. Even if you experienced a viral infection, it’s best to get rid of the old toothbrush in favor of a new one. There are also some over the counter toothbrush cleaners that you can try to clean and sanitize the toothbrush. Depending on how expensive the toothbrush is, it is likely more cost effective just to replace the toothbrush.

Every 3 Months

American Dental Association recommends that you replace your toothbrush every three months. This is a good guideline to start with. This means that you’ll only need to replace the toothbrush four times a year. However, this is just a guideline. Your specific needs may vary and you may need to replace your toothbrush head sooner.

Frayed Bristles

If your toothbrush has frayed bristles, it is time to replace the toothbrush, no matter the age of the toothbrush. Frayed bristles aren’t able to adequately remove dental plaque from your teeth. It takes quite a bit of use for a toothbrush to have frayed bristles. This means that it is time for the toothbrush to be replaced.

After Falling in the Sink

Things can easily happen to a toothbrush that can compromise the cleanliness of your toothbrush. If someone else used your toothbrush or if it fell into the sink, toilet, or floor, it’s time to replace it. Even with a specialized toothbrush cleaner, it can be impossible to know if all of the germs were really removed from the toothbrush.

Signs of Wear

If your toothbrush shows and signs of wear, it is time to get a new one. This can include bent handles, faded colors, or other obvious signs that the toothbrush has been around for a while. You can buy a brand name toothbrush for around $2. If your toothbrush looks worn, you have definitely gotten your money out of it.
Replacing your toothbrush is a normal part of your oral hygiene routine. If you ever feel that your toothbrush should be replaced, it is a good idea to do so. Since toothbrushes don’t cost very much compared to how much they benefit your oral health, go ahead and replace it even more frequently than recommended if you feel that it needs to be replaced.

Want to Learn More?

If you want to learn more about how we can keep your entire family’s smiles in tip-top shape, whether you need regular dental checkups or a metal filling replacement, contact Savannah Dental Solutions today at (912) 354-1366 for more information or to schedule an appointment.

Is It Worth Repairing My Failing Teeth?

Person smiling with broken front teeth

Is It Worth Repairing My Failing Teeth?

The answer to this question is a resounding, YES! Fear of the dentist, lack of insurance or even funds for the deductible are reasons to avoid regular dentist check ups to our local dental health professional. But it is important to take care of your failing teeth before it’s too late.

Why Are My Teeth Failing?

Tooth enamel is one of the hardest tissues in your body. Your teeth begin to fail because the enamel covering them begins to fade, leaving the tooth compromised. There are numerous reasons for the need for tooth repair such as:

Poor dental hygiene
Daily brushing, rinsing with fluoride and flossing is imperative to keep your teeth healthy.

Bad habits
Things such as smoking, ice chewing, and excessive intake of things such as wine, coffee or sugary snacks can lead to the downfall of your teeth’s regular health.

Teeth grinding (also known as bruxism)
This is a common thing for people, especially in times of great stress. This weakens the teeth causing cracks and discomfort.

Other factors also include things from playing contact sports without a mouth guard to tongue piercings. Accidents are also a common cause for a problematic mouth.

How Do I Know My Teeth Are Failing?

There are many levels of failing teeth, but the signs will show you quickly if you learn to pay attention to what your mouth is telling you.

Toothache
This is caused by the beginnings of tooth decay and/or gum disease. This also includes hypersensitivity to hot or cold temperatures. It can be quite painful and is not fixed simply by over the counter pain relievers and chewing with the other side of your mouth. A toothache is caused by an underlying issue such as infection or worn off enamel.

Stained teeth
Many factors can affect the teeth causing discoloration. Things such as what we ingest, play a major role. If you’ve ever eaten a grape popsicle and ended up with a purple mouth, you know this feeling. Other factors such as smoking and coffee may lead to surface stains as well. However, gum disease may also be the cause of your teeth being stained from the inside.

Cavities or a chipped/cracked tooth
When the enamel becomes worn, it leaves our teeth susceptible to debris. This can cause holes in our teeth that will need to be repaired by a dental professional before an infection develops, which can sometimes lead to heart problems, stroke, and even death.

Rotting teeth, gum disease (gingivitis) and impacted teeth are also common ailments that will need attention. As well as crooked teeth, which can bring about pain in the jaw.

How Do I Repair My Failing Teeth?

Modern dentistry has an array of options to help you with your teeth woes. Depending on the severity of your problem they can guide you swiftly through the process. Whether you need something as simple as a sealant to keep your teeth strong or as complex as a root canal or a crown. A simple consultation can easily get your teeth on the road to recovery.

Are you ready to start your journey towards better oral health? Call us today at (912) 354-1366 to schedule your appointment.

How to Conserve Water When Brushing Your Teeth

Although the Earth is covered in water, only about one percent is clean enough for human consumption. That means that even a small reduction in the amount of water you use can be a significant contribution to global water conservation. It can also significantly decrease your water bill over time. Yet many people don’t know how to reduce their water usage during daily oral hygiene and brushing teeth. Here are some easy ways to conserve.

conserve water

Turn Off the Faucet

The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) states that leaving the water running while brushing your teeth wastes an average of four gallons. In a four-person household, where each person brushes twice each day, that’s 32 gallons of water just running down the drain every day, or more than 11,000 gallons per year! Since you don’t use any water between dampening your toothbrush and rinsing your mouth, what’s the point?

Use a Cup

Although rinsing with water from your hands is convenient, you lose a lot of water down the drain. Instead, turn on the tap, capture a little water in the cup, and turn the tap off. If you would like to conserve trees as well as water, choose a reusable cup instead of a stack of paper cups.

Recycle Water

Many people like to run the water for a few moments before brushing, to ensure that it is the right temperature. There’s nothing wrong with the initial water, it’s just not ideal for tooth brushing. So why not recycle it by letting it run into a bowl instead of down the drain. Use it for your pet’s water dish, your plants, or even later drinking?

Fix Leaks

You are a captive audience for the two minutes you spend brushing your teeth, so why not multi-task by checking for leaks. Make sure no water is escaping around the faucet or pipe connections. Even a tiny leak could waste hundreds of gallons in a year, so if you notice any small drips, have them repaired as soon as you can.

Change the Hardware

New water-conserving faucet heads use about 50% of the water per minute that older faucets use. Yet you will scarcely notice the difference. Making the switch is a win-win, as it will lower your water bill while helping with global water conservation.

Teach Your Kids to Conserve

It’s never too early to teach your kids to be responsible citizens of the Earth. Let them see you using good conservation habits, and watch over them as they learn to brush their teeth. With a bit of consistency, your kids will start to save water without thinking twice about it.

With only about one percent of the Earth’s water available for drinking, we should all do our part to help conserve it. Following these simple tips when brushing your teeth can save thousands of gallons of water throughout the year, helping the planet and lowering your water bill.

Married dentists Chad and Alexandra Schnabel welcome you to Savannah Dental Solutions. From caring children’s dentistry to high-tech cosmetic procedures and even full-mouth reconstruction, we blend the latest technology with traditional customer-oriented values. To start your journey to better oral health, call us today at (912) 354-1366.

How Often to Brush, Floss, and See the Dentist

Keeping your teeth clean is the best defense against tooth decay and gum disease. Regular dentist visits help to ensure that any emerging issues are caught early, before they have the chance to spread or worsen. Yet many people don’t know what schedule to follow. Here’s how often to brush, floss, and see the dentist.

brush floss

Brushing

If possible, brush your teeth after every meal. If this is not practical, make sure you brush at least twice per day. Choose a soft-bristled brush that is comfortable for your mouth and hand, and spend a full 30 seconds on each quadrant of your mouth. People’s ability to gauge time is notoriously inaccurate, so consider setting an alarm or using an electric toothbrush with a timer.

Rinse your mouth following each meal and snack. Plain water is best, but unsweetened coffee or tea will do. You can also suck on hard candy or chew unsweetened gum to stimulate saliva production and clear out food debris.

Flossing

Floss your teeth once a day, whether with dental floss, a Waterpik, or an interdental cleaner. Work the floss gently between each pair of teeth and along the gum line. Be careful not to make sudden, sharp movements that could cause cuts. Your dentist will be happy to give a demonstration if you are unsure exactly how to floss.

Seeing the Dentist

Most healthy people will need to see the dentist twice per year. Your teeth will be professionally cleaned, removing tartar and plaque that are difficult to fully brush away, and your dentist will evaluate your oral health.

However, you may need to see the dentist more frequently. If you are at high risk for dental disease, your dentist may request that you come in more often. If you are undergoing any dental treatment, from braces to dental reconstruction, you will be scheduled for more frequent appointments until your treatment is complete. Always follow your dentist’s instructions.

Keeping your mouth clean and healthy is an ongoing process that requires an active commitment. Ask your dentist about anything that you find unclear, and always follow his or her recommendations. For most people, though, flossing once per day, brushing twice per day, and seeing the dentist twice per year will help to ensure a lifetime of oral health.

Married dentists Chad and Alexandra Schnabel welcome you to Savannah Dental Solutions. From caring children’s dentistry to high-tech cosmetic procedures and even full-mouth reconstruction, we blend the latest technology with traditional customer-oriented values. To start your journey to better oral health, call us today at (912) 354-1366.